Wednesday Morning LitLinks

125 brand-name authors vote in the Greatest Books of All Time. (The Atlantic)

McGraw-Hill seems to be looking to sell, rather than branch off, its educational endeavors. (Financial Times)

The publisher of Bernard Schlink’s, THE READER, is in a clash over profits from The Weinstein Company’s film adaptation of it. (Deadline.com)

Edinburgh’s International Book Festival – refreshingly – wants authors, not celebrities, for its headline events. (The Guardian)

The National Times makes a case for why teens should read their porn, not watch it. (The Age)

Books bring nations together: Taiwan and China make cooperative noises over their ties in literature. (Focus Taiwan)

If you don’t like Apples terms, don’t use iAuthor, simple as that says (ZDnet.com)

Hank Haney wishes Tiger would read, THE BIG MISS: MY YEARS COACHING TIGER WOODS, before he gets upset about it. (USA Today)

Bangladeshi author, Taslima Nasreen’s, book, NIRBASAN, sparks a controversy at the Kolkata International Book Fair. (TheHindu.com)

Editor, Sam Vaughan, dies at age 83. RIP (the-leader.com)

“On this day in 1814 Lord Byron’s ‘The Corsair’ was published, selling out its entire first run of 10,000 copies. The poem was one of a handful of melodramatic verse-tales written by Byron between 1812-16, a period in which he was at the height of poetic fame in England…” (Today In Literature)

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