Monday Evening Book Reviews

Patricia Craig on Jennifer Johnston’s A Sixpenny Song: “As ever, Johnston marshals her material with deftness, charm and aplomb, makes an enticing tale of it, and keeps her narrative concise.” (The Independent)

ManofLaBook.com on Lene Kaaberbøl and Agnete Friis’ Death of a Nightingale: “While I found the novel a bit convoluted at times, I did enjoy it and thought the Ukrainian chapters were fascinating and terrifying.” (Blogcritics)

Adam Markovitz on Dana Goodyear’s Anything That Moves: “The mix of mini-profiles, memoirish passages, and research reports doesn’t always blend seamlessly. But the overall effect is of sharing a story-packed meal with Goodyear, an experience any real gourmand would savor — as long as you can occasionally opt not to have what she’s having.” (EW.com)

Hector Tobar on César Aira’s Shantytown: “…with Aira the melodrama quickly falls away. There are no easy truths here, no pat judgments about good and evil. Instead, with a few final acts of narrative sleight of hand (and some odd soliloquies) the reader is left at once dazzled and unsettled.” (LATimes)

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